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Structural Lexicology and the Greek New Testament (paperback)


Applying Corpus Linguistics for Word Sense Possibility Delimitation Using Collocational Indicators


This study demonstrates a method for using corpus linguistics to disambiguate polysemes in the Greek New Testament. Included are several examples applying the method to exegetically problematic texts.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-4220-6
  • *
Publication Status: Forthcoming

Publication Date: Aug 24,2020
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 269
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4220-6
$48.00
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A key issue in New Testament interpretation is the method used in determining the meaning of words and phrases. Moving beyond a traditional view of dictionary definitions, this book shows how an analysis of large corpora of Hellenistic Greek can advance our understanding of lexical semantics. The book traces the development of corpus linguistics as used in dictionary making and demonstrates how this approach can be applied to Greek-English lexica, with a special emphasis on defining words in context by disambiguating their possible meanings. Included are numerous case studies in the Greek New Testament applying the method to exegetically problematic texts.

This book is a practical introduction to the use of digital corpora in the description and definition of New Testament Greek. After introducing the concept of structural lexicology as it has been developed through the use of computational linguistics, computational lexicography and corpus linguistics, the book explains the rationale and basic method for determining the contextual meaning of New Testament Greek words and phrases through an analysis of their collocations, colligations and semantic preferences.

A key issue in New Testament interpretation is the method used in determining the meaning of words and phrases. Moving beyond a traditional view of dictionary definitions, this book shows how an analysis of large corpora of Hellenistic Greek can advance our understanding of lexical semantics. The book traces the development of corpus linguistics as used in dictionary making and demonstrates how this approach can be applied to Greek-English lexica, with a special emphasis on defining words in context by disambiguating their possible meanings. Included are numerous case studies in the Greek New Testament applying the method to exegetically problematic texts.

This book is a practical introduction to the use of digital corpora in the description and definition of New Testament Greek. After introducing the concept of structural lexicology as it has been developed through the use of computational linguistics, computational lexicography and corpus linguistics, the book explains the rationale and basic method for determining the contextual meaning of New Testament Greek words and phrases through an analysis of their collocations, colligations and semantic preferences.

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Contributor Biography

Todd Price

Todd L. Price is the Translation and Training Coordinator for the Roma Bible Society in Budapest, Hungary. He holds a BA in Biblical Languages from Calvary Bible College, an MA with Biblical Languages from Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and a PhD in NT from London School of Theology. Since 1994 he has served as a missionary with Pioneers in Croatia, Bosnia and Hungary, with a special emphasis on theological education and Bible translation.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Acknowledgments (page 9)
  • Abbreviations (page 11)
  • Typographical Conventions (page 17)
  • List of Tables (page 19)
  • Chapter 1: Sizing up Progress in Lexicography and its Application to the Greek New Testament (page 21)
  • 1.1 Recent Advances in Linguistics and Lexicography (page 21)
  • 1.2 Structural Lexicology Improves Accuracy in Greek New Testament Word Sense Disambiguation (page 23)
  • 1.3 Explanation of Terminology (page 25)
  • 1.4 History of CL (page 27)
  • 1.5 Application to the Greek New Testament (page 37)
  • 1.6 Limitations of this Study for Hellenistic Greek (page 40)
  • 1.7 Conclusion to Chapter 1 (page 41)
  • Chapter 2: A Method for Applying CL to Greek New Testament Lexical Semantics (page 43)
  • 2.1 Theoretical Underpinnings (page 43)
  • 2.2 Purpose of the Corpus (page 45)
  • 2.3 Size of the Corpus (page 45)
  • 2.4 Word Count in the Corpus (page 46)
  • 2.5 Genre of Texts to Include in the Corpus (page 48)
  • 2.6 Representative Sample for the Corpus (page 49)
  • 2.7 Length of Individual Texts to Include in the Corpus (page 50)
  • 2.8 Synchronic, not Diachronic, Texts in the Corpus (page 50)
  • 2.9 Dealing with Linguistic Variables in the Corpus (page 56)
  • 2.10 Availability of Appropriateness of Texts in the Corpus (page 62)
  • 2.11 Use of Multiple Corpora (page 64)
  • 2.12 Primary Corpus Contents (page 64)
  • 2.13 Secondary Corpus Contents (page 67)
  • 2.14 Tertiary Corpus (page 69)
  • 2.15 Text Preparation (page 69)
  • 2.16 Conventions for Indicating Word Position (page 72)
  • 2.17 Function Words (page 73)
  • 2.18 Singletons in the Corpus (page 73)
  • 2.19 Supervised Method vs. Unsupervised Method (page 74)
  • 2.20 Inductive and Deductive Approach (page 75)
  • 2.21 Conclusion to Chapter 2 (page 77)
  • Chapter 3: Making Sense out of Meaning (page 79)
  • 3.1 The Primacy of Meaning for Our Study (page 79)
  • 3.2 Metalinguistic Difficulties (page 79)
  • 3.3 Sentential Definitions (page 80)
  • 3.4 Semasiological Approach (page 81)
  • 3.5 Denotative Meaning vs. Connotative Meaning (page 82)
  • 3.6 Defining Context (page 84)
  • 3.7 Polysemy (page 89)
  • 3.8 Default (Typical or Common) Meaning (page 103)
  • 3.9 Conclusion to Chapter 3 (page 104)
  • Chapter 4: Defining Units of Meaning (page 105)
  • 4.1 Terminology for Units of Meaning (page 105)
  • 4.2 Computational Terminology (page 109)
  • 4.3 Disambiguation through Structure (page 109)
  • 4.4 Determining Usage and Composing Definitions (page 110)
  • 4.5 Example of 'With' (page 111)
  • 4.6 Conclusion to Chapter 4 (page 115)
  • Chapter 5: Collocations and Colligations (Part 1) (page 117)
  • 5.1 Collocation (page 117)
  • 5.2 Colligation (page 120)
  • 5.3 Statistical Measurements of Collocations (page 121)
  • 5.4 Differentiating Near Synonyms (page 123)
  • 5.5 S?? and its Collocations (page 129)
  • 5.6 Conclusion to Chapter 5 (page 145)
  • Chapter 6: Collocations and Colligations (Part 2) (page 147)
  • 6.1 ??O Collocated with S?? (page 147)
  • 6.2 ??????S Collocated with S??, ???? and ?? (page 151)
  • 6.3 Conclusion to Chapter 6 (page 173)
  • Chapter 7: Collocations and Colligations (Part 3) (page 175)
  • 7.1 S???S???? and its Collocates (page 175)
  • 7.2 S??????S?S and its Collocates (page 200)
  • 7.3 Conclusion to Chapter 7 (page 202)
  • Chapter 8: Semantic Preference (page 203)
  • 8.1 Semantic Sets and Semantic Preference (page 203)
  • 8.2 S?? used to include smaller 'parts' (page 204)
  • 8.3 S?? with transportable items (page 205)
  • 8.4 S?? + feature OR possession (page 207)
  • 8.5 Conclusion to Chapter 8 (page 209)
  • Chapter 9: Conclusion (page 211)
  • 9.1 Conclusion to our Study (page 211)
  • 9.2 A Final Challenge (page 212)
  • Works Cited (page 213)
  • Index (page 249)